Breakfast/

Chilaquiles for a Crowd

Chilaquiles para una Muchedumbre
Recipe From Season 6 of Mexico - One Plate at a Time
Servings: 12to 16
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Ingredients

  • 3tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2large white onions, sliced ¼ inch thick (divided use)
  • 3cupsFrontera Roasted tomatillo Salsa (1 ½ 16-ounce jars) or homemade (recipe below)
  • 3cups chicken stock
  • 1 1/2cups (6 ounces) shredded Mexican melting cheese (such as Chihuahua) or Monterey Jack, brick or mild cheddar (divided use)
  • 12ounces tortilla chips, preferably thick, homemade-style ones (such as those from a tortilleria or a Mexican grocery store)
  • 3/4cupMexican crema, creme fraiche or sour cream thinned with a little milk or cream
  • 1/2cupfreshly grated Mexican queso añejo or other garnishing cheese such as Romano or Parmesan (optional)
  • Ahandful of cilantro leaves, for garnish
  • 6 sunny-side-up eggs for serving (optional)

Instructions

Preheat your oven to 300 degrees.  In a large (4-quart) pot, heat the oil over medium-high. Add about 2/3 of the onion and cook, stirring regularly, until richly browned, 8 to 10 minutes.  Add the salsa and broth and bring to a rolling boil.  Turn off the heat and stir in 2/3 of the shredded cheese.

Pour the chips into a 13x9 inch baking dish and cover with the sauce, gently pressing the chips into the sauce, breaking up larger pieces, so that all of the chips are coated.  Sprinkle with the remaining 1/3 of the shredded cheeseCover the baking dish with foil, being careful not to let the top of the chips touch the foil.  Slide into the hot oven to heat through, 8 to 10 minutes.  When the chilaquiles are bubbling, remove from the oven, drizzle with the crema and sprinkle with the remaining onion.  Top with the queso aňejo and cilantro, and the optional sunny side up eggs. Serve without hesitation.

 

 

Roasted Tomatillo Salsa

Makes 3 cups

1 pound (about 5 - 7 medium) tomatillos, husked and rinsed

4 garlic cloves, unpeeled

1 or 2 fresh serrano chiles

1 small white onion, sliced ½ inch thick

Salt

 

Spread out all the ingredients on a rimmed baking sheet and slide it as close up under a preheated broiler as possible. After 4 or 5 minutes, when everything is blotchy-black and softening, turn the vegetables and roast the other side.  They will be finished when everything has cooked through (they should be soft) and have an attractive bit of rustic char.  Cool, then slip the skins off the garlic and pull the stem off the chiles.  In a blender or food processor, combine the tomatillos (and any juice on the baking sheet), garlic, chiles, onion and a scant teaspoon salt, and process to a coarse puree.

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Comments

  1. Just love your style of show and what you and your daughter create. The music, the location and your friends are all inspiring. Thank you

  2. Hi, I love all your recipes…just curious…I don’t have a dutch oven and want to know if my big stew pot will work equally or almost as well.

  3. Hi, I love all your recipes…just curious…I don’t have a dutch oven and want to know if my big stew pot will work equally or almost as well. I am not sure I am willing to spend 100$ plus for one recipe

    1. Wayne the salsa has chiles already, If instead of salsa you add regular tomatoes or husk tomatoes than you need to also add chiles. It could be Jalapenos, Anaheim or chiles secos.

  4. I live on the border and we love chilaquiles….make them much like your own but also spread the thick tortillas with refried beans. Muy sabroso! Love your recipes and really loved visiting your great restaurants when in Chicago.

  5. I had chilaquiles at frontera the red ones and they were so mind blowing I could of died and been alright with it after that experience! If these are anything like that i will be the superhero in my house so excited I finally got the recipe. I think I’m gonna cry!

  6. Hi Rick, I got a hold of one of your books some years ago, and WOW! Having lived in Guadalajara and currently in Aguascalientes, I must say that your recipes are 100% authentic and delicious. To the American public who watch your show or read your books, all I can say is that sometimes the American access to authentically made ingredients might be the only hindrance to perfect authenticity, but then, Mr. Bayless has offered exceptional equivalents and ways to make the base ingredients as well as can be had. Thanks, Rick! Cheers, Tom :D

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